Using Archaeological Research to Interpret Your Site?

Archaeological excavations at James Madison's Montpelier in Virginia.

Archaeological excavations at James Madison’s Montpelier in Virginia.

If your historic site or history museum is using or would like to use archaeology in your research (even if you’re not conducting archaeology), the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) is seeking your suggestions and advice to improve and enhance the “For the Public” section of their website via a survey (open until July 22).

SAA launched For the Public in 2006 as a clearinghouse to share resources, best practices, and general information about the discipline of archaeology with both the professional community and the interested public.  The site has now grown to a complex tangle of over 400 linked pages. Many of the pages need substantive revision in content, function, and aesthetic perspectives. As they continue the process of revision, they would appreciate the comments and suggestions from anyone who has an interest in or uses archaeology, including historians, curators, educators, guides/docents, and board members.  The survey will take 10 – 15 minutes to complete and will remain open until July 22, 2015.

For comments or questions about the project, please contact Elizabeth Bollwerk, Project Coordinator of the For the Public Webpages task force at ebollwerk@gmail.com.

One thought on “Using Archaeological Research to Interpret Your Site?

  1. Michelle

    I gave them an earful! We have an archaeology summer camp and an educator’s workshop in archaeology and I could never, in good conscious, send teachers there for information!

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